Topic Nine: Numbers to 1,000

Pacing (Duration of Unit):

Desired Results

Transfer:
Standards for Mathematical Practices
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Established Goals:
2.NBT.A.1-Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:
a. 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens—called a “hundred.”
b. The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).

2.NBT.A.4-Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

2.NBT.B.8-Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100–900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a given number 100–900.

Student I Can Statements:
  • I can understand and used hundreds, tens, and ones.
  • I can show that I understand that a bundle of ten "tens" is called a "hundred."
  • I can show that I understand the numbers I use when I count by hundreds, have a certain number of hundreds, tens, and ones.
  • I can count to 1,000 by 1s, 5s, 10s, and 100s.
  • I can read and write numbers to 1,000 in different ways.
  • I can compare three-digit numbers using <, =, and > because I understand hundreds, tens, and ones.

Prerequisite Standards:
1.NBT.B.2-Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:
a. 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones—called a “ten.”
b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

1.NBT.B.3-Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.
Big Ideas:
Number and the Number Line-The set of real numbers is infinite and ordered. Whole numbers, integers, and fractions are real numbers. Each real number can be associated with a unique point on the number line.

The Base-Ten Numeration System-The base-ten numeration system is a scheme for recording numbers using digits 0-9, groups of ten, and place value.

Equivalence-Any number, measure, numerical expression, algebraic expression, or equation can be represented in an infinite number of ways that have the same value.

Comparison and Relationships-Numbers, expressions, measures, and objects can be compared and related to other numbers, expressions, measures, and objects in different ways.

Patterns, Relations, and Functions-Relationships can be described and generalizations made for mathematical situations that have numbers or objects that repeat in predictable ways. For some relationships, mathematical expressions and equations can be used to describe how members of one set are related to members of a second set.

Practice, Processes, and Proficiencies-Mathematics content and processes can be applied to solve problems.
Essential Questions:

  • How can you count, read, and show numbers to 1,000?
Students will know...
  • Number can be used to tell how many. The number system is based on groups of ten. Whenever there all 10 in one place value, you move to the next greater place value.
  • The number system is based on groups of ten. Whenever there are 10 in one place value, you move to the greater place value. Place-value blocks and drawings can be used to model and write three-digit numbers.
  • The position of a digit in a number tells its value. It takes 10 of a number in one place value to make a number in the next greater place value.
  • There are three common ways to write numbers-standard form, word form, and expanded form. Each way involves using place value to tell the value of each digit.
  • Numbers can be named in many ways. Recalling and using facts about equal amounts (such as 100 is equal to 10 tens, and 10 is equal to 10 ones) can help you name numbers in different ways.
  • Place-value patterns can help you mentally count by 1s and 10s from a given number.
  • Place-value patterns and number lines can be used to help you skip count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.
  • Place value strategies can be used to compare numbers. The symbols >, =, and < can be used to show how the numbers are related.
  • Number lines go on forever in both directions. For every number, there is another number that is greater than it, and another number that is less than it.
  • Good math thinkers look for patterns in math to help solve problems.

Vocabulary:
hundred
thousand
digit
place-value chart
standard form
expanded form
word form
compare
greater than
less than
equal
decrease
increase
Students will be skilled at...

  • Explain place value and count by hundred to 1,000.
  • Model and write 3-digit numbers using place-value blocks and drawings.
  • Tell the value of a digit by where it is placed in a number.
  • Read and write 3-digit numbers in expanded form, standard form, and word form.
  • Make and name a number in different ways to show the same value.
  • Mentally count by 1s and 10s from a given number using place value patterns.
  • Skip count by 5s, 10s, and 100s using a number line.
  • compare numbers using place value.
  • Compare and write a three-digit number that is greater than or less than another three-digit number.
  • Look for patterns to help when solving problems.

Assessment Evidence

Performance Assessment:






Other Evidence:

Formative Assessment Tasks:



Learning Plan

Learning Activities:
9-1-Understand Hundreds

9-2-Models and 3-Digit Numbers

9-3-Name Place Values

9-4-Read and Write 3-Digit Numbers

9-5-Different Ways to Make the Same Number

9-6-Place-Value Patterns with Numbers

9-7-Skip Count by 5s, 10s, and 100s to 1,000

9-8-Compare Numbers using Place Value

9-9-Compare Numbers on the Number Line
Resources: